Dubious staffers of Diamond Bank who tried to use delay tactics to con a professor of his hard earned money have landed in hot soup after he exposed them on Facebook.A Professor of African History at Vanderbilt University, US, Moses E. Ochonu has narrated painfully how some staff of Diamond Bank, Kaduna South Branch tried to use delay tactics to con him of his hard earned money he wired home to his family due to urgent need.He wrote down his frustration which forced many other people to share their painful experiences in the hands of criminal elements within the banks. As a matter of fact, the public exposure forced the bank to act immediately.
Ochonu wrote:“Diamond Bank of Fraud?This afternoon I have a massive grouse against Diamond Bank. Some of its officers are angling to fraudulently appropriate my hard-earned money.I sent some money from my Nigerian bank account to my brother through his account in Diamond Bank to take care of some urgent family problems. Unknown to me, that type of account is not meant to receive “large” (their word to my brother, not mine–never mind that the amount in question is not even large) deposits. Which raises the question: if that type of account cannot receive

“large” deposits, as they say, why the heck did my transfer go through successfully? Why did Diamond Bank not simply reject the transaction? At any rate, the transaction went through and my account was debited.
When I called my younger brother to ask if he got an alert, he said he had not. He then went to Diamond Bank’s Kaduna South branch where he has his account. That’s when the fraudulent folks at Diamond Bank unveiled their elaborate scheme to hold on to my money. First they told him to go home, that the money would return to my account in 48 hours. When that didn’t happen, he returned there. He asked them to check his account. He saw a manager (or someone higher than a teller) who checked his account and told him that the money was not in it but that since the transfer went through, I should contact my bank to request a recall.I realize that Nigerian banks are going through a hard time after years of abandoning core banking operations to chase government deposits, to make fraudulent loans, to package dubious investment instruments, to participate and profit from Forex round tripping, and to perpetrate other shady schemes that are now more difficult with the implementation of TSA and the ongoing recession. But that is not a reason to hold on to my money or to attempt to appropriate it. It’s not a reason to unethically try to detain other people’s funds.If you have stories like this, please share so that, together, we can shame Diamond Bank and any other Nigerian bank whose officials may be engaging in these shenanigans.”